you should know

radon faq’s

We receive a lot of questions about radon and radon mitigation. We’ve compiled a list of the questions we get asked the most. If you have additional questions, please don’t hestiate to contact us.

WHAT IS RADON?

Radon is a naturally occuring gas that is formed when radioactive uranium decays.  It is odorless, tasteless, and colorless so its prescence is unknown if not tested for.​

WHERE DOES RADON COME FROM?

Radon is an element produced from the radioactive decay of uranium. Uranium is naturally found in rocks and soil.  Radon​ gradually moves from the ground into the air.

IS THERE A SAFE RADON LEVEL?

Because radon gas is considered a carcinogen, there is no “safe” level – even the smallest amount of exposure can pose some health risk. However, because it is impossible to have zero radon exposure, the EPA came up with an “aceptable level” of under 4.0 pCi/L.  Above this threshold, mitigation is recommended.

WHAT ARE THE AVERAGE LEVELS?

According to the most recent EPA data, average outdoor levels of radon are 0.4 pCi/L, and indoor levels are 1.3 pCi/L.  These are national averages.  However, the majority of Wyoming and Colorado have elevated radon levels above the national average​.

HOW DOES RADON EXPOSURE AFFECT MY HEALTH?

As radon decays, it produces radioactive particles that can be inhaled and attach to the lungs.  Once attached, those particles can damage the cell’s DNA, potentially leading to lung cancer.  The EPA estimates that over 21,000 lung cancer deaths every year can be attributed to radon exposure.​

RADON TESTED LOW IN MY AREA, AM I SAFE?

Unfortunately​, predicting radon levels is nearly impossible.  Radon travels up the path of the least resistance and enters the house through cracks in the foundation.  Since we can’t see the pathways underground, only a radon test can accurately show radon concentration.  We’ve seen houses that have extremely high radon directly next to houses that fall far below the 4.0 pCi/L threshold.

THREE IMPORTANT RADON FACTS

  1. Radon is the #1 cause of lung cancer in non-smokers
  2. 21,000 people die from radon-related lung cancer every year
  3. Radon can be present in all types of homes regardless of age, location, and foundation type

 

Big Horn Radon, LLC is owned and operated by Stephen Fotiades and his wife, Taylor.

© 2019 Big Horn Radon, LLC